An interview with artist Terrance Osborne.

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Did you always know you wanted to be an artist?

No, I didn’t. Initially, I was a gymnast and I thought that’s what I would be. But, I had this undercurrent of art. I drew all the time, my mom did it as a hobby so I picked it up from her and kept going with it.

How did you turn art into a career?

That’s probably a number of pivotal moments, but in middle school, I joined an organization called Talented Arts Visual, and this was the first time I met a practicing…

An interview with artist August Lamm

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https://www.instagram.com/augustlamm/

So to start off, I just want to let you know I’ve totally stalked you on Instagram.

Oh my god, I’m such an easy person to stalk. I just put everything out there. I’m like ‘here’s what I look like from every angle and here’s everything that’s ever happened to me.’

Where have you lived? Why do you move around so much?

I grew up in Connecticut. When I dropped out of college for the second time, I moved to Berlin with a suitcase and banjo. My plan was to play music on the…

An interview with artists John and Anni Furniss.

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John and Anni

Introduce yourselves!

Anni: I started painting when I was around 17 or 18. I struggled with depression when I was a teenager, I had a really hard time. My mom gave me my great-grandfather’s paints, he was an artist. I started painting and I wasn’t very good at it but I loved it. It snowballed into different art mediums after that. Photography was my main art form for over 15 years. About four years ago, I stopped doing photography, it was starting to become a little commercial for me and losing its…

A conversation with cinematographer & photographer Brandon Hoeg

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Brandon on set.

Introduce yourself!

Yeah, so I’m a 23 year old cinematographer and photographer living in Chicago.

What did you go to school for?

I graduated from DePaul University in 2018 with a BFA in digital cinema and my concentration was in cinematography.

Did you always know you wanted to do that?

I had always liked the idea of making things. I liked editing weird little videos together or making weird short films with my friends. For a little bit, I wanted to do environmental activism and I wanted to pursue soccer in college…

An interview with artist & designer Mikki Philippe

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Matthew, 2019 acrylic on deconstructed canvas

Introduce yourself!

My name is Mikki Philippe. I’m a 5th year senior at University of Missouri — Columbia. I’m majoring in fine arts with an emphasis in painting and a minor in history. I’m from St. Louis.

How did you get started?

*Groans!* My mother said she always knew I would be an artist, but I think every artist’s parents say that.

So did you always know you wanted to pursue art?

I actually wanted to be a lawyer! I wanted to do political science and study history, but I figured if…

An interview with artist Liv Molho

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Chaos… Everywhere | March 2020, 2ft x 5ft

Introduce yourself!

I am 22. I just graduated from Brandeis University with high honors in studio art.

Did you always plan on studying art?

I didn’t go to school thinking I would be studying art. My grandma is a painter and I’ve been painting my whole life, but growing up in a society where we’re told being an artist isn’t lucrative threw me off. I came to school thinking I’d be a business major. By sophomore year I was like ‘This sucks. I hate this. …

and the lack thereof

As an English major, I quickly became familiar with the western literary canon (the classics) and the issues surrounding it. Throughout college, I read Shakespeare, Donne, Wilde, Emerson, Poe, Thoreau, Conrad and so on. What do the names on this list have in common?

The most influential works in literary history, the ones we consider to be “classics,” are, more often than not, written by white men. The western literary canon has effectively erased, hidden, and discredited works by women and people of color. And that is just the thing, these works exist, and have always existed. Men and women…

A brief AR Introduction

What is augmented reality (AR)?

Augmented reality is quickly becoming a fixture in our everyday lives. AR technology allows us to superimpose objects into the real world, meaning you view your surroundings, in real time, but with a digital object present. Through AR, intangible digital images are mixed with our corporeal surroundings. It may sound like a foreign, futuristic concept, but the reality is, we have already been using AR in our everyday lives for some time. The wildly popular game, Pokémon GO, is one example of people using AR. Remember seeing Squirtle appear on the sidewalk in front of you?

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Photo from Pikist.com

How is AR different from VR?

I wish I were the sort of person who could walk into an art gallery or museum and know exactly what I am talking about. You know, the kind of people who are like, “Wow, the concept of this abstract expressionism really speaks volumes about how New Yorkers were feeling in their post-World War II existences.” But in reality, if you asked me my favorite painting style, I would say, “I don’t know…What is Starry Night?” (Post-Impressionism, by the way).

So, in an effort to understand what the f*ck everyone is talking about, I have decided to familiarize myself with…

The Forgotten Muses.

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Portrait of Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo © RMN-Grand Palais (musée du Louvre) / Michel Urtado

The word “muse,” often conjures up images of hauntingly beautiful women who inspire men to create incredible works of art. They are the faces of Mona Lisa, The Birth of Venus, or The Weeping Woman. It is likely that you know the names Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, and Pablo Picasso. It is less likely that you have heard of Lisa del Giocondo, Simonetta Vespucci, or Dora Maar. Herein lies the problem of “the muse.”

These are the names of the women who purportedly inspired the aforementioned classic works of art. …

Sophie Miller

Content writer at Hangable Technologies LLC.

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